Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Masala Sanna Khotte - Spicy Idli (2)

 


During my cabbage marathon cooking, I thought of masala sanna khotte. These steamed dumpling is a variation of Masala Sanna Khotte(1).

Masala Sanna Khotte - 2
Spicy Steamed Dumpling
Ingredients
1/4 cup toor daal
1 cup rice

Grind
8-10 byadgi chilies, roasted in few drops of coconut oil
1/2 cup fresh coconut

You will also need
1/2 tsp asafetida
1 tsp tamarind paste
salt
1 cup finely shredded cabbage

Coconut oil to grease the mold

Method
1. Soak toor daal and rice overnight.
2. Next morning, grind to a smooth paste along with roasted chilies and coconut.
3. Cover and set aside for about  8 -10 hours.
4. Right before steaming the idlies, stir in asafetida and tamarind paste. Add shredded cabbage.
5. Adjust the batter consistency, adding more water as needed.
6. Grease idli mold with coconut oil. Pour the batter.
7. Steam for about 45 minutes.
8. Serve hot with coconut oil. Serve as an accompaniment with your meal.

Note -
1. For most authentic flavor, use containers made with jackfruit leaves.
2. This idli is not as fluffy as the usual idli.


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Monday, July 27, 2015

Kultha Idli - Horsegram Idlies


Idlies using kulith or horsegram is a traditional Konkani delicacy. It imparts a distinct flavor so it may be an acquired taste. For a truly authentic flavor, do use coconut oil for greasing the idli moulds and also serve these idlies hot off the steamer along with a drizzle of coconut oil.

Kultha Idli
Horsegram Idlies
Ingredients
1 cup urad daal
1/2 cup kulith sprout
2 cups rice
1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds
salt to taste

coconut oil as needed

Method
1. Soak urad daal, kulith/horsegram and (rice+fenugreek seeds) separately.
2. Drain and grind to a smooth paste.
3. Cover aside to ferment for 7-8 hours. Add salt and mix.
4. Grease idli moulds with coconut oil or any oil of your choice - although coconut oil is preferred.
5. Pour a ladleful of batter.
6. Steam the idlies.
7. Serve with coconut oil and chutney of your choice.

Note -
1. Traditionally, kulith are soaked, drained and used. I use kulith sprouts for this recipe.


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Sunday, July 26, 2015

Punjabi Egg Curry

 
My mom makes this Punjabi style egg curry. When she first made it way back when I was in school, all of us were blown away that a non-vegetarian curry was made without an iota of coconut! Today, when I don't know what to make on Sundays, this curry comes very handy. Mom always used to add some potato chunks in her mutton curries. I took that inspiration to add potatoes in the egg curry.
 
Punjabi Egg Curry
Ingredients
4 hard  boiled eggs, peeled and halved
4 baby potatoes, halved or leave whole
 1 tsp garam masala - preferably freshly made
2 tsp coriander-cumin powder
1 tsp Kashmiri chili powder - (For color)
salt to taste
 
Grind to a smooth paste
1 1/2 cup sliced onion
3/4 cups tomatoes
1 tbsp. ginger garlic paste
1/4 cup cilantro
2-3 green chilies or per taste
 
Tempering
1 tbsp. oil
2 cloves
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
 
Suggested Accompaniment
or
&
Paratha/Rumali Roti
And/or Jeera Rice
 
Method
1. Boil eggs and potatoes. Peel the eggs and halve them.
2. Heat oil. Add cloves and turmeric powder.
3. Add ground onion paste. Sauté for 15 minutes or so till the raw smell of onion goes away.
4. Add garam masala, coriander cumin powder, Kashmiri chili powder and salt.
5. Add 1 1/2 cups water. Bring to boil.
6. Place eggs and potatoes. Simmer for 10 minutes.
7. Garnish with cilantro
 
Note -
1. You can peel the potatoes or leave them unpeeled. You can keep them whole or halve them.
2. If Kashmiri chili powder is not available, use paprika or any mild chili powder for color.
3. The most important step is sautéing the ground onion paste till raw smell disappears. It may very well take more than even half an hour. If you are hard pressed for time like me, I add oil in the pressure cooker. Add tempering. Sauté masala paste for 5 minutes. Add 1/4 cup water and pressure cook for 2 whistles - before adding eggs. This expedites the process and onion mixture no longer smells raw.
 


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Saturday, July 25, 2015

Masala Sanna Khotte - Spicy Idli (1)

 

 


I haven't eaten Khotte in ages. But these days, Indian storeowners bring many uniquely exotic vegetables. So I am hoping that one day I may even get jackfruit leaves. You see, khotte are steamed in the containers made using jackfruit leaves. After they are steamed, the idli gets a very unique flavor. The leaves are meant to be discarded. When we visited "Robert is here" in Miami, I longingly looked at their jackfruit tree.  I wished they were selling jackfruit leaves along with their delicious fruits. I guess, only a Konkani can understand that feeling about jackfruit leaves.;-)

Mom mentioned that Ram Nayak's Idli House in Matunga/King Circle area serve all the Konkani idlies - Khotte and masala khotte included. They are served with chutneys, but more importantly with coconut oil as well. There are two ways (with or without cabbage) Masala Khottes are made in my family. So for keeping records, I am going to blog both the methods. However, accept my apologies since there are no jackfruit leaves to be seen in my part of the world. So I steamed them in my usual idli stand. One can make banana leaves wrapper as I had tried here. But still for qualifying it to be the authentic khotte, jackfruit leaves are essential.

Please note that these khotte are heavier than usual fluffy idlies. They are served as a side dish with your daily Konkani meal.

Masala Sanna Khotte - 1
Spicy Steamed Dumpling
Ingredients
1/4 cup toor daal
1 cup rice

Grind
8-10 byadgi chilies, roasted in few drops of coconut oil
1/2 cup fresh coconut

You will also need
1/2 tsp asafetida
1 tsp tamarind paste
salt

Coconut oil to grease the mold

Method
1. Soak toor daal and rice overnight.
2. Next morning, grind to a smooth paste along with roasted chilies and coconut.
3. Cover and set aside for about  8 -10 hours.
4. Right before steaming the idlies, stir in asafetida and tamarind paste.
5. Adjust the batter consistency, adding more water as needed.
6. Grease idli mold with coconut oil. Pour the batter. Traditionally, the batter is poured into the moulds made up of jackfruit leaves.
7. Steam for about 45 minutes.
8. Serve hot with coconut oil. Serve as an accompaniment with your meal.

Note -
1. For most authentic flavor, use containers made with jackfruit leaves.
2. This idli is not as fluffy as the usual idli.



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Thursday, July 23, 2015

Tingalavrya Bendi - White Beans Curry


 


Remember my post about the South Canara curries? Each curry has a distinct name and that name itself indicates which tempering to use, and thus each curry results in a unique flavor - although basic ground masala paste is coconut + tamarind + byadgi chilies. So those who are not very familiar with South Canara cusine may find each curry is orange colored but the name clearly tells not only the tempering, but also the consistency of the gravy, consistency of ground masala paste (coarse or fine), heat level (e.g. Ghasshi and Ambat are mild while koddel & Bendi/बेंदी are hot!)

When in Mumbai, I head straight to my most favorite Mahima Mangalore Stores at Hill Rd. They stock up some good Konkani delicacies. This is the place where you will get your Tingalavre and Fajjav - though they may not be on their display. Mostly, their display consists of usual snacks and other tidbits. But do ask the owner about those Konkani delicacies, and if they are in season, you may get them. So I was lucky that "Tingalavre" was in season. We make two curries with it. Bendi (Using Garlic tempering) and Tepla Randayi (Using Teppal/Tirphal).

Tingalavrya Bendi
White Beans Curry with garlic
Ingredients
 3/4 cup dry Tingalavre, soaked for 6 hours in adequate water
salt to taste

Grind
3/4 cups freshly scraped coconut
15 byadgi chilies, roasted quickly in few drops of coconut oil
1 1/2 tsp tamarind paste

Tempering
2 tsp coconut oil
5-7 cloves of garlic, peeled & smashed but still left whole

Method
1. Soak tingalavre in water for 6 hours. Drain and pressure cook using enough water. Set aside.
2. Heat a pan. Drizzle few drops of coconut oil. Roast byadgi chilies.
3. Grind fresh coconut, roasted chilies and tamarind to paste.
4. Pour cooked beans in a saucepan. Add ground masala paste. Add enough water per desired consistency.
5. Add salt to taste. Bring to boil. Switch gas to low. Let it simmer.
6. In a separate small saucepan, heat coconut oil. Add garlic cloves. Fry till brown.
7. Drizzle hot oil with garlic over the curry. Switch off the gas and cover the curry with a lid.
8. Serve with plain rice.

Note -
1. Traditionally, bendi (बेंदी ) is on thick side. Adjust water per your preference.
2. Bendi is also very hot. Adjust chilies per your preference.

Tingal Avre From Mahima Mangalore Stores, Bandra


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Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Grape Tomato Salad

 
Grape tomatoes are abundant in our farmers' market this year. I make this simple grape tomato salad. I pluck some fresh mint from my kitchen garden to garnish. This simple salad goes really well with spicy curries or pulaos.
 
Grape Tomato Salad
Ingredients
1 box grape tomatoes, halved or quartered
1 lemon, freshly squeezed
2 tbsp. minced onion
1 tbsp. cilantro, chopped
1 tbsp. mint, chopped
salt and black pepper - freshly ground
 
Method
1. Mix all the ingredients and serve immediately.
 
Note -
1. Do use fresh cilantro and mint.
2. Do use freshly squeezed lemon juice.
 
 
 



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Sunday, July 19, 2015

Bharli Vangi (Sode ghalun) - Stuffed Eggplant with dried shrimp

 


Sode ghalun Bharli Vangi is a CKP delicacy. I haven't followed the authentic CKP recipe here but my version was loved by those who love sode/dry shrimp. Technically speaking, sode are big dried shrimp and the ones that I get at Indian stores, is a smaller variety.

Bharli Vangi (Sode Ghalun)
भरली वांगी (सोडे घालून )
Ingredients
8 small eggplants, slit cross wise leaving each eggplant in tact
2-3 kokums
1 tsp coconut oil

Grind to paste
1/4 cup cilantro
1" ginger, peeled
4-5 garlic cloves
1 green chili
1 tsp lemon juice

For stuffing
1 cup dried prawns
1/2 cup freshly scraped coconut
1/2 cup minced onion
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp garam masala
1 tsp chili powder
salt to taste

Tempering
1 tbsp. oil
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/2 tsp asafetida

Garnish
1 tbsp. minced cilantro

Method
1. Soak dried shrimp in water for 1/2 hour. Squeeze water and drain completely.
2. Mix with ground green paste and set aside.
3. Remove the stems of baby eggplants. Make cross slits leaving each eggplant in tact.
4. Mix coconut, onion, turmeric powder, garam masala, chili powder and marinated shrimp. Adjust salt as needed.
5. Stuff each eggplant with above mixture. There should be plenty more remaining.
6. Heat oil in a saucepan. Add turmeric powder and asafetida. Place stuffed eggplants in a single layer. Spread all the remaining stuffing around it.
7. Add kokum and 1/3 cup water. Cover with a lid. Pour water on the lid.
8. Let it cook on low flame till it's well done. This should be on the dry side.
9. Drizzle coconut oil.
10. Garnish with cilantro.

Note -
1. Dried shrimp that I had, were already cleaned and ready to use.
2. Generally dried seafood has plenty salt content. Take it into consideration while adding salt.





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Friday, July 17, 2015

Cabbage, Cabbage and More Cabbage



I was excited to buy this huge cabbage head for $2 at the farmers market. The farmer said that she picked it just previous night. I couldn't even hold this huge cabbage in my hand. Out of sheer curiosity, I weighed it after coming home and it was a whopping 7 lb cabbage. I shredded the cabbage and placed them separately into ziplock bags in the crisper section. I realized that I had a daunting task of using all the cabbage pretty soon. In my excitement, I had overlooked it. I wanted to distribute my shredded cabbage among friends, but somehow, I was too busy to go to everybody's house that weekend. So I took a deep breath and decided to feed my family cabbage pretty much on daily basis. I froze some items and used up all the cabbage!  While going through this cabbage quest, I realized that I still haven't cooked and blogged my maushi's kobichya karanjya! [Well hopefully sometime in distant future - since I am done with this cabbage business for a while!!;-)

Here's what I made -

Kobichya Vadya
Pav bhaji (Added generous cabbage along with other veggies and mashed them together)
Kachcha Kobi
Kobi Thepla
Cabbage Idli -Masala Sanna Khotto(Recipe Coming Soon)
Kobi Bhaat
Kobi Bhutti
Kobij na pooda
Kobichi Bhuji
Kobi Appe

Note to self - Do not get too carried away when visiting Farmers markets and ahem, no more cabbage for at least next 3 months!!;-)

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Wednesday, July 15, 2015

Garlic Scapes Chutney


 
I spotted these beautiful garlic scapes at our farmers market. They looked distinctly different than fresh garlic that we get in Mumbai during winter. The farmer told me that they come in two variety - local and California. He gave me both of them. He suggested making pesto with it. I gave that suggestion - my very own Indian makeover. I used some for making chutney to be served with idlies and I made "Kolhapuri Thecha" with the remaining.
 
 
Garlic Scapes Chutney
Ingredients
3-4 garlic scapes, cut into small pieces
1/2 cup coconut
2 tbsp. Pandharpuri DaLe/puffed chana daal
1/3 cup plain yogurt
3-4 green chilies (Adjust per heat)
salt to taste
 
Tempering
1 tsp oil
1/4 tsp mustard seeds
1/4 tsp asafetida
2 red chilies, broken
1 sprig curry leaves, torn
 
Method
1. Grind garlic scapes, coconut, puffed chana daal, chilies and salt to a coarse paste.
2. Add yogurt and grind again.
3. Pour into a serving bowl.
4. Heat oil in a small saucepan. Add the ingredients for tempering. Let them splutter.
5. Drizzle over chutney.
6. Serve with hot idlies.
 
Note-
1. Chop garlic scapes and discard any rough parts.

Fresh Garlic Scapes


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Monday, July 13, 2015

Stuffed Focaccia Sandwich

 
 

We went to the Farmers market and got summer fresh sweet corn. We then went to Panera and after eating sandwich, hubby decided to buy focaccia. I asked the server at the bakery section if he could cut the bread for me. He suggested that he could even cut it horizontally so it can be used for making sandwiches. I liked the idea.

Following week, while thinking about dinner menu, I thought of making stuffed focaccia sandwich. I had already boiled the corn adding salt and turmeric power. I cut them into niblets and proceeded to make this sandwich.

If you don't have focaccia, use this stuffing for making grilled sandwich using sliced bread.

Stuffed Focaccia Sandwich
Ingredients
1 Italian Focaccia bread, cut horizontally
2 slices pepper jack cheese

For stuffing
1 tbsp. oil
A pinch of sugar (to caramelize onions)
1 cup thinly sliced onion
4-5 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup boiled and drained corn niblets
2 tbsp. oven roasted tomatoes in oil
1/2 cup chopped collard greens
1 tsp Italian seasoning
salt and pepper to taste

Method
1. Heat oil in a saucepan. Add sugar and as it caramelizes, add onions and garlic. Saute till onion is nicely browned. Add corn niblets, oven roasted tomatoes and collard greens. Cook till done.
2. Add seasoning, salt, pepper. Mix well. Set aside to cool down.
3. Scatter pieces of cheese slice on one half of the focaccia bread.
4. Cover it with stuffing generously.
5.  Top it with pieces of remaining cheese slice and cover with the remaining half of the bread.
6. Preheat oven 350 F. Cover in kitchen foil and bake for 15 minutes or till the cheese melts.
7. Serve a wedge along with soup of your choice.

Note -
1. There will probably be extra stuffing. It can be used to make grilled cheese , corn stuffing using bread slices.





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Sunday, July 12, 2015

Khubbya Randayi - Clams Curry


It's funny how I refer to the same ingredient by various different names based on the recipe that I am following. When I am making my maternal grandmother's South Canara style curry, I refer to clams as Khubbe. When I am making my paternal grandmother's Malvani style curry, I refer to the same clams as Tisrya. :-)
 
Today let's visit my South Canara heritage and relish Khubbya randayi or Manglore style Clams Curry. This recipe is exactly similar to Sungta Hinga udaak. But for some unknown reason, when making this curry with clams, it's always referred to as Khubbya Randayi and not Khubbya Hinga Udaak.
 
Khubbya Randayi
Ingredients
1 packet Costco little neck clams
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
 
Salt to taste (Adjust)
 
Grind to a fine paste
1 cup freshly scraped coconut
12-15 byadgi chilies, roasted in few drops of coconut oil
2 tsp tamarind pulp
 
Garnish
1 tsp coconut oil
1/2 tsp asafetida
 
Method
1. Scrub and clean the clams.
2. Place them in a heavy bottomed big container. Add 1/2 cup water and turmeric powder.
3. Cook till the shells are open. Switch off the gas. Cover
4. Let them cool down till they are easy to handle. Take out the flesh.
5. Drain the clam juice. Set aside.
6. Meanwhile, roast byadgi chilies using few drops of coconut oil. Grind to a very fine paste adding coconut and tamarind pulp. Add water as needed for grinding.
7. Place cooked clams, clam juice in the saucepan.
8. Add ground masala and enough water to get the desired consistency.
9. Adjust salt.
10. As the curry comes to a rapid boil, switch the gas to low.
11. Let it simmer.
12. Drizzle coconut oil and asafetida over the curry.
13. Let it simmer for at least 10 minutes.
14. Switch off the gas. Cover.
15. Serve with plain rice.
 
Note -
1. Clams may have salt content. Adjust salt accordingly.
2. Clams are covered with lots of sand. Scrub carefully, making sure that they are sand free before cooking.
3. Drain the clam juice to avoid any sand particles.
4. After initial cooking, discard any clams that don't open up.
5. When in season, add peeled, raw mango pieces to this curry. If using, add them along with ground masala paste. Adjust tamarind accordingly.
6. Many home cooks in Mumbai use a knife or viLi to crack the clams and then use them in the curry. In my family, we boil the clams first, and let the clams open the shells instead of using knife.
 

Saturday, July 11, 2015

Salgam Song - Turnips Curry




I spotted some fresh turnips/salgams at our farmers market. I decided to make "Saung". Traditionally, saung uses potatoes. I replaced them with turnips. This curry tasted delicious.

Salgam Song
Turnip Curry
Ingredients
3-4 medium turnips, peeled, cut into chunks
1 medium onion, roughly chopped
Salt to taste
1 tbsp coconut oil or any other oil of preference

Grind to a coarse paste
5-6 byadgi chilies, roasted in a drop of coconut oil
1 tbsp tamarind pulp

Method
1. Heat oil. Saute onion till golden brown. Do not let it burn.
2. Add turnip pieces, stir. Cover with a lid. Pour water on the lid. Let it cook.
2. Add ground masala paste. Saute for 1 minute.
3. Add 1/2 cup water. add salt to taste.
4. Bring to boil.
5. Let it simmer. This is a thick curry. Adjust consistency per your own preference.
 
Note -
1. The coconut oil gives a unique and authentic flavor. However, if you are bothered by the saturated fat contents in the coconut oil, you can use canola or olive oil. and then add a few drops of coconut oil for flavor.
2. Instead of grinding the masala, sometimes, I just mix chili powder and tamarind pulp for a quick fix.

 


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Thursday, July 9, 2015

Shevga Palebhaji - Drumsticks Leaves Stir Fry

 


I try to include some leafy greens or the other at least 3 times a week. During winter, I just use frozen collard greens, turnip greens or spinach. But now it's spring turning into summer. Farmers markets and Indian stores bring in some exotic leafy greens. This is the best time to eat fresh greens.

Shevgyachi Paaleybhaji


Ingredients
1 bunch tender drumsticks greens, rinsed, roughly chopped
1/4 cup yellow moong daal, soaked for 2 hours
salt to taste

Tempering
1 tsp oil
1 shallot or small onion, finely chopped
4-5 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped or slivered
A pinch of turmeric powder
2 red chilies
2 green chilies

Garnish
1/4 cup freshly scraped coconut

Method
1. Chop drumsticks leaves and stems - if they are tender. Chop the onion.
2. Heat oil in a saucepan. Sauté garlic and pinch of turmeric till garlic changes its colors. Add chilies and shallot. Sauté till onion is soft.
3. Add drained moong daal. Sauté for 5 minutes.
4. Add chopped drumstick leaves. Sprinkle some water. Mix.
5. Cover with a lid. Pour water on the lid.
6. Let it cook till soft.
7. Add salt to taste and coconut.

Note -
1. This bhaji needs more coconut than usual.
2. Use more or less chilies per personal preference.

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Tuesday, July 7, 2015

KeLya Gabbya Upkari - Banana Stem Stir Fry


When I wanted to blog about Sanjimaayi's KeLya Gabbya Kochcholi, I substituted banana stems with Hearts of Palm from the can. I had thought then, that I would need to make a trip to Matunga, Mumbai to get the fresh banana stem. But never in my wildest imagination, I had thought of getting fresh banana stem right here in my city.

I was overjoyed to see it and wasn't even sure if I would know how to cut it. But the shop owner told me what needs to be done.

KeLya Gabbya Upkari
Banana Stems Stir Fry
Ingredients
1 banana stem, peeled & chopped about 2 cups
salt to taste

1/4 cup yellow moong daal, soaked for 1/2 hour

Tempering
1/2 tbsp. coconut oil
1/2 tsp mustard seeds
1/2 tsp asafetida
3-4 byadgi chilies, halved
2 springs curry leaves, torn

Garnish
A generous handful of scraped coconut

Method
1. Take a banana stem and give a gash to peel off outer layer till you get the inside banana stem. Please see the cross section of the banana stem. You need to get rid of at least 2 layers to get inside the stem.



2. Dice the peeled, tender banana stem into small pieces. It should be cut smoothly. Otherwise if it is too rough to be cut, discard the piece.
3. Put the diced banana stem into a buttermilk to avoid discoloration.
4. Heat oil in a saucepan/kadhai/bogaLe. Add the spices and chilies. As they splutter, add soaked moong daal. Stir fry for 30 seconds. Add drained banana stem pieces. Discard the buttermilk.
5. Cover with a lid. Pour water onto the lid. Let it cook.
6. Add salt to taste.
7. Garnish with scraped coconut or coconut pieces.

Note -
1. I used coconut pieces instead of scraped coconut.
2. Instead of moong daal, chana daal can also be used.

Banana Stem/KeLya Gabbo




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Friday, July 3, 2015

Shevgyache Daangar - Drumsticks Leaves Fritters

 

 
Drumsticks leaves and flowers are devoured in Malvani/Konkani cuisine. When I got these precious leaves at our local Indian stores, I knew right away that I would make bhaaji and daangars.
 
Shevgyachya Paananche Daangar
Drumsticks leaves fritters
Ingredients
1/2 cup drumsticks leaves, roughly chopped
1/2 cup chickpea flour
2 tbsp. rice flour
1 shallot, finely chopped
1 tsp ginger-garlic paste
1 green chili, minced
salt to taste
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
1/4 tsp asafetida
1/2 tsp chili powder
 
Oil for shallow frying
 
Method
1. Mix chopped leaves, chili and shallot.
2. Add flours, salt and dry spices. Mix.
3. Add ginger-garlic paste.
4. Add water as needed to make a thick batter.
5. Heat tawa. Pat small ball of dough. Drizzle oil as needed.
6. Flip and let it brown on both sides.
 
Note -
1. This is served as a side dish with daily meal.
2. Omit green chili if you don't care for biting into chili pieces.
 



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Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Pumpkin Leaves Daal

 

 
This month, I will try my best to show case some unusual veggies. Let's see if my farmers market, Indian stores and my enthusiasm keep up with this pledge!
 
Today's recipe is Pumpkin Leaves daal. Pumpkin leaves and stems are very much edible and they go well with this Konkani masala. There are two ways you can make this daal. You may choose to temper it with garlic cloves or you may use tirphal/teppal. But please be mutually exclusive about it. Do not use both as the flavors will counter balance each other.
 
Pumpkin Leaves Daal
Ingredients
1 bunch Pumpkin leaves
1/2 cup toor daal
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
salt to taste
 
Soak in 1/4 cup warm water
6-7 tirphal/teppal
 
Grind to a coarse paste
1/2 cup coconut
1 tbsp. coriander seeds, roasted
5-6 black peppercorns
5 byadgi chilies
1 tsp tamarind pulp
 
Garnish
Few drops of coconut oil
 
Method
1. Shred pumpkin leaves roughly. If the stems are tender, cut it into about 2" pieces. Remove any fibers that are attached to the stem, by cutting a little opening and peeling off the fiber - the way you would do for drumsticks.
2. Pressure cook daal with turmeric powder and adequate water as well as pumpkin leaves and stems.
3. Mash daal lightly after cooking.
4. In a saucepot, add cooked daal and cooked pumpkin leaves and stems.
5. Roast coriander seeds, black pepper corns and byadgi chilies. Grind to a coarse paste with coconut and tamarind. Add water as required for grinding.
6. Pour the masala paste with water into the curry.
7. Add salt and teppal with water. Bring to boil.
8. Drizzle few drops of coconut oil as the curry is boiling.
9. Serve with plain rice.
 
Note-
1. Generally tirphal or teppals are given a little pounding before soaking. Make sure that the berries are not totally crushed or powdered.
2. Do remove the black seeds in teppals.
3. Teppals are added to enhance the flavor. They are not meant to be eaten.
4. Variation - Instead of teppals, heat coconut oil and fry garlic pieces and drizzle over the curry.
 
 



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