Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Khandvi or Sularichya Vadya


A platter of Khandvi & Kothimbeer Vadi

Khandvi in Gujarati and Suralichya vadya in Marathi, both indicate the same yellow colored, jelly roll style savory snack. Probably because it's readily available in the Gujarati Farsan Marts of Mumbai, it is considered more Gujarati dish than a Maharashtrian one. But it's same in both the cuisines, just the name is different.

I was scared to try them, thinking they may be difficult to make. But it was a pleasant surprise to know that they are not that complicated. The consistency of the batter such that it coats the spoon evenly and spreading the batter on the steel plates while still hot are the two key factors in getting a yummy Khandvi.

Khandvi /SuraLichya Vadya
Ingredients
1 cup besan /chickpea flour
1 tsp all purpose flour or corn starch
1 cup buttermilk
1 cup water
1 tsp ginger-chili paste
A pinch of turmeric powder
Salt to taste

Garnish1 tbsp cilantro/coriander leaves, chopped
1 tbsp freshly grated coconut
1 tbsp oil
1/2 tsp mustard seeds

Method1. Whisk buttermilk and water in a saucepan. Add besan and flour. Whisk to make a smooth batter without any lumps.
2. Add salt, turmeric powder, ginger-chili paste. Stir well.
3. Turn on the gas. Keep stirring. The gas should be on the lowest mark.
4. Let it cook for about 11 minutes. Make sure it doesn't stick to the bottom or burn.
5. Take about 1/4 cup batter and spread thinly on the steel plates (thalis).
6. While spreading the batter, keep the saucepan on the low flame so it's easier to spread.
7. Cut about 2" slits by knife and roll up like jelly rolls.
8. Garnish with coconut and cilantro.
9. Take a microwave safe small bowl. Add oil and heat it for 30 sec. Add mustard seeds and heat it again for about 30 sec to hear the spluttering. Pour the hot oil over the Khandvi.

and here's the recipe for the Kothimbeer Vadi

Note -
1. Do not grease the thalis before spreading the batter.
2. Cut the strips only after the rolled batter has cooled down.

Credits:
1. Microwave tempering idea is based on Ms. Julie Sahani's book Moghul Microwave.

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